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Educator indicted on drug charges

| Mar 28, 2013 | Drug Charges |

While some area residents might snicker at the irony of the situation, there is nothing funny about the drug-related offenses that an assistant professor at Radford University currently faces. One media report pointed out that the professor was known to lead a seminar entitled “War on Drugs” at the school.

The professor was recently indicted on one count of possession of marijuana. The man was also indicted on three counts of possession of a Schedule I or II controlled substance. This included synthetic drug substances that are banned in the state. These are often referred to as bath salts.

The drugs were allegedly discovered when police showed up at the man’s house. A neighbor had noticed the man’s side door was open and phoned authorities.

An officer that responded claimed that he announced the fact he was there. No one in the home answered, so the officer decided to enter the house, claiming that he was looking for potential burglars inside.

Instead, he allegedly uncovered drugs and drug paraphernalia in one of the rooms. This included a green plant material and white, powdered substance. There was also a smoking pipe, rolled-up dollar bill and a mirror in the room.

The officer never encountered anyone in the home, and he left to go obtain a search warrant.

Luckily, the man can wait to answer for his charges outside of jail as he was released on a $5,000 unsecured bond. Neither he, nor the school at which he taught, offered a comment on the pending case.

The defense could look at the method in which police found the drugs to ensure authorities preserved the man’s rights against illegal search and seizure. He could fight the charges in court, or barter with a judge and possibly receive a lesser sentence in exchange for a guilty plea.

Source: PilotOnline.com, “Radford ‘War on Drugs’ professor facing drug charges,” Melissa Powell, March 13, 2013

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